Tuesday, October 4, 2016

Reflection of Data in the Classroom

Thinking about your department's plan for data reflection (i.e. how learning targets are used and how data from formative assessments based on learning targets are tracked, reflected, gathered), share a student sample that was created in your classroom.

Attach a link to the student sample and explain the following:

  • How did the student gather, track, and reflect on his/her data?  Did you use a data tracker form, reflection template, or something similar?
  • Did the student explain how he/she met or did not meet the learning target?  
  • Describe the process that made this successful in your classroom?  If it didn't meet your expectations, what are you planning to change to make it more meaningful for the students?

33 comments:

  1. https://docs.google.com/a/tcboe.org/document/d/1Tt_U4e2fpEa5CdKGAWOhFS8irt1ceeRjR_R2zr8p8yo/edit?usp=sharing
    Here's the link to my response to this question along with student examples.

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  2. The link to my response
    https://docs.google.com/document/d/1r74DselRhIHSVZZnO5ZhfzPouTaUikIEulNVDCCEtAI/edit

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  3. https://docs.google.com/a/tcboe.org/document/d/1qW32CL_blNzhXVZJFspzhIX85FAZOM4yq0iKB02Bt98/edit?usp=sharing
    Here is a link to my response.

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    1. https://drive.google.com/open?id=0B6wYZli0k_-YZGRUZV9CM1N4VnM
      Link to a picture of my student responses.

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    2. https://docs.google.com/a/tcboe.org/document/d/1tuL_ptYze1oNdDG9OAWpax1odd1av0kpxbcFhjnaYNI/edit?usp=sharing

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  4. This comment has been removed by the author.

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    1. Here is the new link! Sorry!

      https://docs.google.com/document/d/1E6WZ0c1oTKwOZeEpA1N2Jt3pUOvk0_zDTpWHjN0k_I4/edit

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  5. Here is the link to my response.

    https://docs.google.com/a/tcboe.org/document/d/1UwK9nRsd7vm-cCe8xu-ru9Dt3gLcmF7cEIVz8XP921I/edit?usp=sharing

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  8. The Science Department agreed that it would be at the teacher’s discretion as to how they wanted to formatively assess as well as gather, track, and reflect data. I have provided a sample from each of my classes as it relates to data reflection.

    Human Anatomy & Physiology & Forensic Science:
    Part of the daily procedures, each student is responsible for the following information as a Bell Ringer. Their Bell Ringer consist of writing the I can statement in the top margins of their paper as well as the QOD prompt. Each student has guidelines to use while responding to the daily prompt. Upon leaving class that day, each student is responsible for a Quick Write. The Quick Write allows each student to reflect on the lesson for that day. Their guidelines that they must use to ask them to provide to concrete examples from that lesson to support their written response. How well they respond to the Quick Write shows comprehension of the I can statement and if he/she met the learning target. This process is successful in my classroom because it sets the tone of what is to be expected for the day, activates prior knowledge and ensures that they make real world connections to support and justify their response using evidence from class!

    Daily Formative Assessments: I can Statement, QOD and Quick Write

    Sample Link:
    https://drive.google.com/a/tcboe.org/file/d/0BynqfOe_AQYRZDVqemhDbDU3OVk/view?usp=sharing

    https://drive.google.com/a/tcboe.org/file/d/0BynqfOe_AQYRR3JGX2pTWVNiaUE/view?usp=sharing


    Human Anatomy & Physiology
    Anatomy is currently tracking their mastery of the standards as well as the learning targets collectively by graphing their results for each assessment. Before each Chapter they all undergo a Pre-Test and immediately graph their results from socrative.com. After covering all standards, a summative assessment is given on the chapter and the results are graphed. Graphing of the data allows them to see their growth and reflect upon that growth as we maneuver to the next chapter.

    Sample Link:
    https://drive.google.com/a/tcboe.org/file/d/0BynqfOe_AQYRNS1YMi0zRFJ5SEk/view?usp=sharing

    Human Anatomy & Physiology
    As we adventured into the unit of cells and our PBL, students had to show their day-to-day progress by utilizing BLOGGER and blogging entries as we solved a real world problem! Each blog entry allowed reflection of a variety of strategies or experiments that took place in class. The blog definitely showed how each met their learning target or did not, by justifying evidence that was provided in each daily blog entry. This was a successful reflection piece because it added technology, engagement, real world connections and explained evidence in a personal setting to them.

    Sample Link:
    http://cytoskeletonandchloroplast.blogspot.com/
    http://anatomy2mhs.blogspot.com/
    http://destinyball13349.blogspot.com/
    http://dabcity256.blogspot.com/
    http://cyjajo.blogspot.com/


    Pre AP Biology
    Pre AP Bio has a structured curriculum that places ownership on each student. They have daily assessments and homework guidelines that allow them to reflect on the progress in the class as well as each individual learning target. We use a flipped classroom setting where they read, study, and annotate their outlines the night before in preparation for the days lesson. The next day they immediately have a data set (HOT MC ?) and concluding the interactive lesson for the day, a synthesis question (detailed short answer sentence). Synthesis is design to be 3 sentences of less (detailed and precise). Both assessments allow each student to take ownership of their work!

    Daily Sample:
    Annotations:
    https://docs.google.com/a/tcboe.org/document/d/1GUTK9jKNl3znATCNBeNUpPIiZ-smcarNIEv-eil79KQ/edit?usp=sharing

    Data Set:
    https://docs.google.com/a/tcboe.org/spreadsheets/d/1GxhEzymFcMCJKk2KFbha0xFjbiUDdj8u4O4xZOIe78/edit?usp=sharing

    Synthesis Questions: https://docs.google.com/a/tcboe.org/spreadsheets/d/1RtuUnaqTFthzloF4LfTCNpOxLX22Kn6NlwnDJu6Moxo/edit?usp=sharing

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  9. I have used a reflection template where students reflect toward the completion of each lesson. I do this by using composition notebooks as reflective journals, although I have begun to utilize digital reflections for my Economics students. Students reflect on what were their respective strengths and weaknesses. This has been a great "after" strategy though I am looking to make reflections 100% digital in an effort to provide quick feedback to their reflections so that I can ask additional probing questions based on their reflection. Below is a sample student reflection that I asked students to complete at the conclusion of the first nine weeks grading period.

    https://docs.google.com/document/d/144MPLVCa6XdXsjh2-xQ-kWKIPj77-o1xKp2nIAtAW3s

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    1. While it took getting used to due the constraints of time that we already have daily and the self-induced pressure to maximize the bell-to-bell time that we have with the students, I have enjoyed the concept student-reflection in my instruction. Designing lessons that include a purposeful opportunity for reflection benefit both the students and me because the lessons add an element of forced-assessment into them; that is, the students have to consider what they know and what they do not through reflection. This ultimately helps them to invest in the learning rather than being a passive participant. Reflection can also help students make connections into their lives that help to make the material more relevant.

      One example of how I have incorporated the opportunity for reflection in my classroom is a reflection narrative that I had my AP Lit students complete following the resubmission of an essay for a short story entitled “The Yellow Wallpaper.” The students wrote a timed, in-class essay on the literary elements found in the story, and I gave feedback to them in class or through a recorded screencast. They revised the essay incorporating the feedback into their rewrite, and I asked them to write a brief narrative explaining what they changed and why. I feel as though through this reflection, they will be cognizant of the best-practices that they need to be mindful of going forward as they continue to grow as writers.

      A method of reflection that I used with my students who are not in the AP class was a reflective journal that we did following each part of the epic of Beowulf that we read in class. Following each section, the students answered five specific questions about the text in which they made personal connections to the text, identified new words, made predictions, and considered how the story reflects the values that the Anglo-Saxons, the original authors of the story, held. Through this journal, students were able to actively engage the text and see how the story is still relevant today.

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    2. Reflection Samples:

      https://docs.google.com/a/tcboe.org/document/d/1aJBEDv45BDrQ7nTjiip9ct9qCPlo89EvBh624d_z8ag/edit?usp=sharing

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  11. For my English classes, I have done individual written reflection on major tests. Students have looked at their strengths and weaknesses on each test. From this analysis, they were to reflect on the things they did well, as well as ways to improve in the future.

    https://drive.google.com/drive/folders/0B_ylj1UFOluUZkJfRjZEcnNqNjA?usp=sharing

    With my reading intervention students, we are using the "Data Tracker" in their Google Drive to chart and discuss gains and losses with each attempt on the STAR360. For some of them, it became very obvious that the data doesn't reflect well on their ability to do math and reading. Hopefully, their scores will improve as they see progress/realize the importance of the test/or if they are maybe a little embarrassed at their current GL equivalencies.

    https://docs.google.com/a/tcboe.org/spreadsheets/d/1lJD27-jNQR0lzCCVZFFNA6oHAS-zxw2s49A8kKbxEuY/edit?usp=sharing



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    1. https://drive.google.com/drive/folders/0B_ylj1UFOluUZkJfRjZEcnNqNjA?usp=sharing UPDATED LINK

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  12. Sample and response is on the google/doc.

    https://docs.google.com/a/tcboe.org/document/d/1J6pqg0XOljHqqRuUw1G93LWQwFZcqM-DdG1pAdxXwdQ/edit?usp=sharing

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  13. After each test, my students are noting which standard/objective he or she did not meet and writing them on an index card. We discuss each problem they did not understand or need clarification on how to solve the problem. We have a test correction/reteach lesson. Students update their index cards to indicate which problems they need more practice and help with. I collect the cards and determine which station activities we need to have for the following days. The first time we analyzed our data and completed the reteach lesson and test corrections, we found only two problems of the same standard that we needed more instruction and practice. Many students said that they just made many simple mistakes and now understand what they did wrong. During our next class, we focused on analyzing and solving several examples similar to the problems they missed. Many of my students said they felt better about how to solve problems involving average rate of change and solving literal equations. Their following test scores improved dramatically.

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    1. https://drive.google.com/a/tcboe.org/file/d/0B2q-7Y1ce5UFRFQtMXZmZ05HUk0/view?usp=sharing

      https://drive.google.com/a/tcboe.org/file/d/0B2q-7Y1ce5UFM1dpdEl1TWlnX1U/view?usp=sharing

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  14. https://docs.google.com/a/tcboe.org/document/d/1YxxrSHLOIu9g4HEYAewS3tuCW8QgJQoMx1F5SFVu-LE/edit?usp=sharing

    https://docs.google.com/a/tcboe.org/document/d/1vAJeIMZZyPdcIs1caoz8yMubM2XblGUJKV-KOJxeGtk/edit?usp=sharing

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  15. In all my classes, students used reflective journal responses to record what they have learned for each lesson. Students must respond to an essential question that measures what they have learned for that day. We can take that information and see if students show progression as that take quizzes and test.

    In my US History classes each student was responsible for peer editing another students 5 paragraph essay. This way we can monitor student progress through their writing. Later we will be able to check if student writing has improved.


    https://docs.google.com/a/tcboe.org/document/d/1YxxrSHLOIu9g4HEYAewS3tuCW8QgJQoMx1F5SFVu-LE/edit?usp=sharing

    https://docs.google.com/a/tcboe.org/document/d/1vAJeIMZZyPdcIs1caoz8yMubM2XblGUJKV-KOJxeGtk/edit?usp=sharing

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  16. Career Tech data is gathered by Kim Knight (Career Teach Coordinator for Talladega County.) At the beginning of each school year a power point data presentation is prepared focusing on the Reading & Mathematical scores of Career Teach students across the county. Based on the data given Career Tech teachers can see if they have a positive influence on Reading & Math scores in the county. If the scores do not meet requirements then all Career Tech teachers discuss ways to better implement Reading & Math strategies in the classroom by sharing successful teaching strategies.

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  17. Career Tech data is gathered by the career tech coordinator this information is then shared with career tech teachers. Strength and weaknesses are identified allowing focus on areas of concern. As a career tech body teachers share innovative ways to teach reading and math strategies across the curriculum.

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  18. Here is the link to my response.https://docs.google.com/a/tcboe.org/document/d/1itnbhjoyhb28a50aIG1ExlNPMDlgh0ebt-JfzD_ixs0/edit?usp=sharing

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  19. Link to my response and samples:
    https://docs.google.com/a/tcboe.org/document/d/1qzu2lgFD6om3rqP3z_1SoLYvMoM29bunb8sa3uj96X4/edit?usp=sharing

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  20. We use reflection through Journals or Exit Slips at the end of classes. Students will write a quick journal or quick write to answer what they have learned related to the Daily Learning Target. This helps me tailor my lessons going forward to help students understand what they are struggling with. I have found this very helpful, and I feel it has allowed students to better understand what we are learning. It also lets the students see if they have a good understanding or bad understanding of the material. This is a simple, but effective way for me to use formal assessment to check for understanding. I really like it because it is effective for each student in my class.
    https://drive.google.com/drive/u/0/my-drive

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  21. Data Reflection Blog

    I have tried different strategies when it comes to data reflection in my classroom. At the beginning of the year, I gave all my classes a pretest (Algebra 1 questions) to see which Algebra 1 skills they needed before we moved into Geometry. After I graded the tests, I passed them back out to the students. They were to write down on a notecard : 3 strengths and weaknesses according to the tests. After reading the notecards, I realized which Algebra concepts I really needed to touch on before moving into Geometry. I plan to come up with a better strategy like the “My Favorite No” video for post tests.

    I also use Kahoot in my classroom a good bit for after strategies and review for tests. This is a good way for me to collect data quickly to see which learning targets or standards I need to reteach to the students. The students also can see as a whole the data of each question ask.

    The example I have is from an activity that included math, writing, geography, and history. We completed a distance and midpoint mapping activity. After the math portion of the activity, the students had to write a short story about the data they had collected.
    At the end of the activity, the students were to answer a set of questions for an exit slip. What were their strong/weak points for this activity? If they could do anything different what would it be? Is there an easier way to complete this activity?

    I am working toward coming up with better strategies when it comes to student reflection of data to help better the learning in my classroom. I plan to spend more time with student reflections.

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    1. https://drive.google.com/open?id=0B3livSRxiFjQUjRldTNTeWk3Q2s
      https://drive.google.com/open?id=0B3livSRxiFjQVHRiaEVVdDVPUTQ
      https://drive.google.com/open?id=0B3livSRxiFjQTzk5NkV4SW9KT0U

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  22. Reflection of Data in the Classroom

    Everyday when my students come into my room their first task is to write down their objective/learning targets so that they know exactly what we will be discussing for the day. For my AP Biology students I use two different formative assessments that I use on a daily basis. My first assessment is their daily data set. These questions are designed to gauge the student’s understanding of their nightly reading assignment’s. Because the students are in an advanced placement course we have an abundance of materials that we need to cover in order for them to be prepared for their AP exam. Because of this students are required to read 3-4 pages nightly so that as a class we can have an in-depth conversation about the concepts covered and still have plenty of time to bring those concepts to life. Some of these data sets are completed on paper but most of them I have them submit as a quiz on Socrative that way we have immediate data for us to analyze. When the student chooses the answer(s) that they believe to be true it immediately tells them if they were correct or it will explain if their answer was considered the “distractor” (meaning they were almost the write answer but one word or phrase was incorrect and it is the most likely option that students choose instead of the correct answer) and it also explains why the answer was not correct. After the individual student sees their score we then speak about it as a class. We do not single out the students that missed it because we do not announce who got it write or wrong. We simply debrief the right and wrong answers then I take the graph that socrative provides me with to show how many students answer correctly and incorrectly.
    Example of the socrative form:
    https://b.socrative.com/teacher/#final-results/25318262/18692435/table
    https://b.socrative.com/teacher/#final-results/25224997/18222660/table

    The second assessment that we do on a daily basis is the synthesis writings. These also gauge understandings of the topics of that day’s lesson. Students are given a question and are prompted to answer that question in no more that three sentences usually. This prepares them for the writing that is involved on the AP exam and also help me to formatively assess what they understood from the class and what concepts were missed. In order to help them see what they are missing we swap papers in the class and grade them together. This allows each students to see what i am looking for when I grade this assignment as well as guide their writing for the next question. Doing this daily has really helped my students grow as writers and this exercise has help them to see this as well. We then talk about how these writing prompts and then students quake whether or not that they have mastered their learning target or if they need to devote extra time to this concept before our summative assessment.
    Overall these assignments have been very successful in making my students accountable for mastering their learning targets. These daily assessments have really made them work on their ownership of their grades and added more motivation to their studies. I am very pleased with how these assessments have played out. The only thing I might want to change is having a scale or a more appropriate way for students to know whether they have mastered the objective. Or a more in depth reflection of their data. I also need to have some sort of data tracker for them so they can keep up with it from day to day since we only discuss it the day of the activity.

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  23. https://drive.google.com/open?id=1GKnrGuG-Sus3fSyHJ8Hu-1EvzGtbSDSY-TktjsMRmOs

    Time is a huge factor that many teachers struggle with. We are not just responsible for teaching, but many of us have other duties such as clubs, coaching, and professional development that away from what little time we have during the day. One of the biggest issues I have is providing feedback in a timely manner. Students need this opportunity to analyze their data, and reflect on their learning objectives. One method I have found to be successful is using a google forms assessment. Students will answer a google form, and once submitted, the form automatically grades their work, and sends them a copy along with the correct responses. The data from the class is then automatically put into a google sheet, and allows the teacher to view the responses, as well as the percent correct. This way, I do not have to shuffle through a hundred papers and return them to the students. It’s also a quick and easy way to see how many of the students mastered the learning target for the day. I have tried this as an exit slip, and then when the students come in the next day, they take the first few minutes of class to correct their responses they submitted the previous class. I take it a step further by having them to “justify” their responses rather than just telling me what the correct answer was. For example, students were giving a picture of a mixture at a molecular level, and had to choose whether it was homogeneous or heterogeneous. If the students answered incorrectly, they next day they would have to tell me the correct answer, and why that is the correct answer (homogeneous: because the different color molecules in the picture were bonded together in a uniform composition). This seemed to help the students understand more than me going over the correct answers. The students took a little more responsibility, and I also noticed that some of the ones who understood the concepts peer tutored the others without me specifically asking. I would like the try this as a pre-lab and post-lab activity to see how well the students relate the lab activities to the content.

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  24. We use reflection through Journals or Exit Slips at the end of classes. Students will write a quick journal or quick write to answer what they have learned related to the Daily Learning Target. This helps me tailor my lessons going forward to help students understand what they are struggling with. I have found this very helpful, and I feel it has allowed students to better understand what we are learning. It also lets the students see if they have a good understanding or bad understanding of the material. This is a simple, but effective way for me to use formal assessment to check for understanding. I really like it because it is effective for each student in my class. https://docs.google.com/document/d/1dFWEW_enCz4gtCMur6sS7syPiwNTWLz6N1shRHBFBqQ/edit

    ReplyDelete